"Nothing is more real than Nothing."~Samuel Beckett




Key Concepts
  • Negative Space
  • Using a Basic Unit
  • Relating to the Format


Using "negative space" to define composition

Read pp. 116-120 in DRSB. See especially Fig.7-2 on page 120, read what Dr. Edwards has to say on page 120 about how the format controls the composition. Find an object which you can trace repeatedly to create a variety of different compositions within the formats.

formats1.jpg
formats4.jpg

What should I draw? NOTHING

Using a viewfinder, try drawing a chair by only drawing vertical lines to fill in the negative space around the chair, not the chair itself. If it's easier, use scratch board instead of pencil.
Mallory_neg_chair.jpg
line_chairs_2.jpg






The 'Basic Unit' Concept

Read pp. 123-126, beginning with "Choosing a Basic Unit." Answer questions on the following worksheet:

Here is a short video explaining sighting and measuring your subject when drawing from life by University of Georgia Art Major Sasha Stowers:

Sighting and Measuring Techniques from Sasha Stowers on Vimeo.




Your negative space drawing of a chair

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CHAIRS_011.jpg

After learning about choosing and using a "basic unit" to help with placement and proportion, and about how the "picture frame" and negative space help with composition, Drawing and Seeing students drew a still life of a chair on 18x24 newsprint pads. They had a full week to do this

  • Read the directions on pp. 127-132, draw a chair in your sketchbook
  • Draw 2 other objects in yoursketchbook, emphasizing the negative space
  • On 18x24" Newsprint pad:
    • Draw a large chair (still life)
  1. Give yourself a 2" margin all around the page
  2. Tone your page with graphite
  3. Choose/use a "basic unit" (see pp.123-126)
  4. Start by drawing the negative space around the chair, but...
  5. Fully finished, detailed, shading etc.

CHAIR DRAWING SELF-CRITIQUE FORM